Eliane Consalvo - LAER Realty Partners



Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 1/14/2018

It’s always a goal in life to be happier in our jobs and make more money. When it comes to buying a home, your job status can have a big effect on whether or not you’ll be able to buy a home or not. You will be able to buy a home using a new source of income. Even refinancing can be a breeze when you have a new job and the right knowledge. 


Many people believe that changing jobs or having gaps in between employment is a certain type of black hole when it comes to getting a mortgage. However, if you approach all of the changes in the correct way, you should be able to land the mortgage deal and secure a home.


Average Income


One of the most important numbers that your lender will calculate when you’re buying a home is that of your average income. This will be based on the pay that you had earned in the past 24 months‘ time. If you have had the same job and pay, this won’t be much of a big deal, However, if any of these things have changed (or will soon change) your lender may have some questions. This doesn’t mean that your mortgage application will be struck down completely. 


Information That’s Needed In The Event Of A Job Change


If you have recently changed jobs in the process of trying to refinance or buy a new home, your lender will need a few pieces of information from you. These items include:


  • An offer letter for the job
  • A role or title change letter (if applicable)
  • Compensation package change confirmation
  • Verification of employment
  • Most recent pay stub


Hourly Employees


If you’re an hourly employee, unfortunately, you’re under the tightest type of scrutiny when it comes to applying for a mortgage. Your income will be averaged for as long as you have been an hourly employee. If you work full-time, this won’t be too much of a problem. If your hours fluctuate from week-to-week, this can make things a bit more complicated.


If your hourly rates have recently gone up, you’ll need a bit of info from your employer to help you get the income verification that your lender needs. These items include:


  • An offer letter
  • Recent pay stubs
  • The new compensation structure or offer

If you have any sort of extenuating circumstances like a relocation or a new position, this information can help to bridge the gap in any information that just doesn’t add up as far as your employment history goes. 


Salaried Employees


If you’re a salaried employee, things are a bit simpler. Your lender will have a much easier time calculating your average income. The only issue that you may encounter is if you have had a gap in employment. For this, your lender will require a written explanation of what occurred during that time period.  

 

Lenders want to protect themselves, but in a way, they also want to protect you from getting in over your head with how much you can afford for a home. With some proof and a little explanation, you should be able to get a house you can afford if you have all of the information that you need to back up your financial history and employment history.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 1/7/2018

No homeowner wants to borrow more money. However, if you’re experiencing hard financial times or looking for a way to fund a home improvement project, there are ways to borrow money with your home as collateral.

In this article, we’re going to talk about home equity loans and home equity lines of credit (HELOC). We’ll explain how they differ and break down their benefits and risks.

Before the bubble

Before the financial crisis of 2007-2008, many homeowners were borrowing readily based on the equity of their home. Interest rates were low on home equity loans, encouraging homeowners to leverage their portion of homeownership.

During the recession, however, all of that changed. People owed more money on their mortgages than their homes were worth, and banks became reluctant to lend.

In recent, years, however, house prices have been creeping back up, and banks and homeowners alike have gained confidence in the equity of their home.

As a result, a growing number of homeowners are turning back to home equity loans and lines of credit as a source of low-interest financing.

So, what exactly are these loans and credit lines?

The difference between a home equity loan and a line of credit

A home equity loan is a lump sum of money that you borrow which is secured by the value of your home. Typically, home equity loans are borrowed at a fixed rate. Lenders take into consideration the amount of equity you have in your home, your credit history, and your verifiable income.

A home equity line of credit (HELOC) is a bit different. Like a credit card, you are able to borrow money as you need it via a credit card or checks. HELOCs often have variable interest rates, which means even if you’re approved for an initial low rate it could be increased. As a result, HELOCs are better suited for borrowers who can withstand a higher leverage of risk and variation each month.

Is now a good time to borrow?

If you’re a homeowner, there’s an understandable temptation to use the equity you’ve built over the years to your advantage. In some cases, home equity loans and HELOCs can earn you better interest rates than other forms of borrowing.

However, as with other loan types, it’s important for homeowners to realize that HELOCs and home equity loans are not the same as having cash in your savings account.

Another danger that borrowers face is the potential for foreclosure if things go badly. While most lenders won’t seek foreclosure after a few missed payments, your home has been put up as collateral for repaying the loan. Most lenders will choose to sell a defaulted loan to a collections company rather than seek foreclosure.

Ultimately, the best course of action is to avoid borrowing unless it will help you out financially in the long term. However, for those with high home equity who may, for one reason or another, need to borrow, a home equity loan or line of credit might be the best choice.





Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 12/31/2017

If you’re looking to buy a property in the near future, you may be considering a condominium as a part of your search criteria. There’s so much to consider when you are deciding on whether to buy a condo or a traditional home. Condos can be great for the right buyers. You just need to be sure that your needs will be met by purchasing a condo. Hopefully, laying out the pros and cons will help you to make an informed decision that’s right for you.

The Positives

There’s many great pros to buying a condo. For people who seek security and easy upkeep living, buying a condo can be great for the following reasons:   

Security: Many condominiums offer gated communities with security staff on duty. In this way, living in a condo gives you a special sort of safe community feel. 

Amenities: Condos also offer many different kinds of perks for owners. These can include a pool, a clubhouse, or community events. You won’t get all of these unique benefits living in a traditional house.

Maintenance: You don’t have to worry about maintaining your home or the surrounding areas. In a condo, someone else takes care of it for you! When your heating unit fails, it will be taken care of. This is one of the great benefits to this style of home.  

Accessible prices: Condos are much more affordable than homes in many places.  Purchasing a condo can be a great first step to home ownership.   

The Negatives


HOA Fees: All of the amenities that condos carry come at a price. You as the homeowner cover the costs of maintenance and security in the community. This fee is paid on top of your mortgage payment. In some cases, the association fees can vary widely, so plan your finances accordingly. 

Privacy: Living in a condo is similar to living in an apartment. There’s a lack of privacy that exists when you’re sharing walls with your neighbors. You’ll hear people going up and down the halls and fellow owners will be around you 24 hours a day. If you enjoy your privacy and space, condo living may not be for you. 

Selling: If you have seen one condo in a specific complex, you have seen them all. That’s what makes selling a condo difficult at times. If a building has more empty units than not, the condo may be more difficult to sell. Keep this in mind when you’re searching.   

Condos Have Rules: Living in a condo means you’re living under the management’s rules. You may not to be able to install the technology that you want like solar panels and satellite TV under the community regulations, for example. A condominium's home owner association may limit things like what you can do in your yard or hang on your door.

In Summary

The decision to buy a condo over a single family home is a big one. There’s many different things that need to be considered on an individual basis for your choice to be complete. Look at your decision from all angles. A condo could be a great pathway to home ownership for many people.       





Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 12/24/2017

If you plan to sell your house, you should be proactive. Because, in most cases, a proactive home seller is a successful home seller.

With a proactive approach, a home seller can find unique ways to differentiate his or her house from the competition. That way, this home seller can boost his or her chances of a quick, profitable home sale.

Now, let's take a look at three best practices for proactive home sellers.

1. Upgrade Your Home's Interior and Exterior

Ensure your house looks great both inside and out. By doing so, you can guarantee your residence will make a long-lasting impression on homebuyers.

When it comes to improving your home's interior, it pays to mop the floors, wipe down the walls and ceilings and perform assorted home interior maintenance. If you need extra help along the way, you can always hire a professional home cleaning company as well.

To upgrade your home's exterior, you should mow the lawn, remove dirt and debris from walkways and perform any necessary home siding repairs. Remember, your house only gets one chance to make a positive first impression. And if your home's exterior dazzles, it will increase the likelihood that a buyer will want to set up a home showing.

2. Conduct a Home Appraisal

What you paid for your house a few years ago is unlikely to match your home's value today. Luckily, a home appraisal can help you set a competitive price for your residence from day one.

During a home appraisal, a professional appraiser will examine your home's interior and exterior. He or she also will evaluate assorted housing market data and use all of this information to provide a property valuation.

After you receive a home appraisal report, you should review the report findings closely. By leveraging all of the report data, you should have no trouble establishing a competitive price for your residence.

3. Work with a Real Estate Agent

If you want to be a proactive home seller, you need to work with a real estate agent. In fact, a real estate agent will do everything possible to help you accelerate the home selling process and ensure you can get the best price for your house.

A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of selling a home and will teach you about the home selling journey. Plus, he or she will learn about your home selling goals and guarantee you can accomplish your aspirations.

Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is happy to set up home showings and open houses, promote your residence to potential buyers and negotiate with a buyer's agent on your behalf. And if you have home selling questions, a real estate agent is happy to answer them.

There is no need to take a wait-and-see approach to selling your home. Instead, use the aforementioned tips, and you can become a proactive home seller.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Eliane Consalvo on 12/17/2017

Selling a home requires time, dedication and patience. As such, you need to be aware of the biggest dangers associated with selling a residence before you add your home to the real estate market; otherwise, you risk wasting your valuable time and resources. One of the biggest home selling dangers often remains ignored – self-sabotage. And if you're not careful, you may sabotage your chances of selling your residence without even realizing it's happening. So what can you do to avoid the danger of self-sabotaging your home sale? Here are three tips that home sellers can use to eliminate this risk altogether: 1. Be Realistic About the Price and Value of Your Home. Employ a professional appraiser to evaluate your home before you list it on the real estate market. By doing so, you'll be able to better understand what your home is worth and price it appropriately. Also, keep in mind that what you ask for your house may not be what homebuyers offer for your residence. For instance, in a seller's market, you might actually receive multiple offers that exceed your initial asking price. Conversely, in a buyer's market, you may wind up getting numerous offers at or below your original asking price. Regardless of whether you're selling your residence in a buyer's or seller's market, however, it is important to remain flexible. Ultimately, you need to feel comfortable with the initial asking price you set your house and the offers you receive for your residence, and only then will you be able to finalize an agreement that works well for both you and a homebuyer. 2. Act Fast on Any Offers You Receive. It is paramount to prepare for offers before they arrive, as this will enable you to act quickly and efficiently. Typically, you'll only have a short amount of time to decide whether to accept a homebuyer's proposal. And if you plan for prospective offers you'll receive, you can act confidently under duress. Consider how you'll respond if you receive an offer that meets or exceeds your initial asking price, along with how you'll respond to an offer that falls below your initial expectations. Because if you plan for the best- and worst-case scenarios, you'll be better equipped to minimize the chance of sabotaging a home sale. 3. Work with an Experienced Real Estate Agent. Collaborate with an experienced real estate agent, and you'll be able to prevent the risk of self-sabotage. A real estate agent will help you determine the best price for your home and get your residence ready for a home showing. Meanwhile, this professional likely will possess years of experience and ensure you understand the ins and outs of the real estate market, allowing you to make the best decisions possible relative to your home sale. Find the right real estate agent to sell your home – you'll be thrilled you did! With an expert real estate agent at your disposal, you'll be able to improve your chances of finding many interested homebuyers and getting multiple offers for your residence. Understand the danger of self-sabotage, and you can prevent this problem from arising as you attempt to sell your house.